Can-Am’s Livin’ the Land Series Shows the Working Life of UTV Owners

A look at the women who depend on Can-Am for their farm life

Can-Am UTV video series lead
From sunup to sundown, Alex Templeton works harder than most.Can-Am

In the world of UTVs there are the folks who love to play and there are the ones who love to work. Can-Am wants to celebrate the latter while highlighting the strong female landowners of America with a new video series, Livin' the Land. Currently there are two episodes, each less than 10 minutes long.

The first episode highlights Mary Heffernan and her four daughters, all named Mary. The family left the hustle of Silicon Valley to start a ranch they dubbed Five Marys Farm. They raise cattle, pigs, and sheep which are then processed and shipped across the country. Together with her husband Brian, Mary has turned her small farm into a seven-year success story. What started as a “part-time ranch” has become a full-time life of work, happiness, and accomplishment.

For the second video of the series, Can-Am points the camera at Alex Templeton. Alex is a third-generation farmer, carrying the torch of her family’s legacy. A refusal to bow to the status quo, Alex works the land, drives the cattle, hunts, and more. With a work ethic stronger than most, she now owns her own farm and pushes herself to be a role model for women everywhere. Living, breathing proof that she can be just as successful in the rugged and hardworking world of farming as anyone else.

Can-Am UTV with cattle
Four seats for Five Marys, and a bed full of hay for the cattle.Can-Am

In our eyes, the most important part of this entire series is Can-Am, or rather the lack of. These women rely on the utility and versatility of their Can-Am side-by-sides to be successful. Despite that, Can-Am doesn’t treat them or their stories as cheap advertising material. These videos are dedicated to the strong women, not to their choice of side-by-side. We applaud Can-Am for choosing to make this about individuals who are changing the world, rather than treat them as window dressing for a long commercial.

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